Sell like a pro: price it right for a successful sale

Are you new to marketplace selling? Take our advice to create the most effective listing and help your ski clothes sell FAST!

Part 3 : Pricing your item right will help it fly out of WhoSki.com and into the hands of another skier. If your goal is to sell quickly and your motivation is to keep ski clothes out of landfill and in active usage: our tips should help.

Perhaps your ski kit has been on sale for a while but still not been snapped up? A price reduction might help… Read on for more secondhand sales pricing tips.

Part 1: Our tips on how to post images that will help sell your ski clothes

Part 2: Our tips on how to write the best description for a successful sale

1 Get the pricing right

Experienced skiers know that a new designer ski jacket could come with a £500+ price tag. But let’s face it, most of us would not dream of paying jaw-dropping prices like that.

Be realistic when you are pricing your garment for re-sale. Think affordable. However, be wary of pricing it too cheap unless you really want a fast sale – buyers may suspect it is damaged or of poor quality.

Top tip: Use the description box to mention the as-new RRP of your item to make it clear what kind of deal your buyer is getting.

2 What is a realistic price?

Bear in mind that secondhand items rarely sell for even half the original price, unless they are pristine ie unused, with the original labels still attached.

Selling on your pre-loved clothing helps reduce its (and your) carbon footprint. It is a way of recouping some of your outlay but we advise that you set your sights realistically. Think about the eco benefits of ensuring your clothes get maximum wear – and remember we donate to charity on every sale.

Top tip: High Street brands sell quickly – they are affordable and your customer is familiar with them, so do price accordingly. People will spend more on designer brand ski clothes, but remember affordability is key in the secondhand sector.

3 Check the competition

Browse the WhoSki.com shop on a regular basis. You will start to learn what sells, at what price, and what seems to shift more slowly. Make sure you are signed up to receive our emails which announce new listings so you can keep an eye on the competition. (If you’re not already a WhoSki.com member, register here for your email updates.)

When pricing your outfit, check what else is on offer at WhoSki.com. If you spot something similar, check the cost and think ‘Would I pay that?’ to give you a steer on your price point.

Top tip: Selling items affordably as a set rather than individually may help attract a buyer eg a pack of ski socks, a selection of base layers or matching ski jacket and salopettes. If they don’t sell, split and re-list them individually.

4 Be prepared to drop your price

We are a fixed-price marketplace, not an auction site, but it is easy to adjust the pricing of your items if you find they are not selling. Simply log in, visit your account and edit your listing. You can also re-write the description to make it clear you have reduced the price, if you wish.

Top tip: Think about timing when trying to sell your pre-loved ski clothes. The pre-Christmas period is buzzing as is half-term for kids’ stuff. Towards the end of the ski season, there is generally little ski clothing left in the shops so you may well clinch a last-minute sale at WhoSki.com.

One extra point to bear in mind: the ski season for UK skiers is relatively short. Most transactions in our marketplace take place between October and April, but you can leave your items on sale at WhoSki.com for as long as you like. If they don’t sell this season, they may well be snapped up next.

Read full WhoSki.com listing rules here

Remember to let your audience know via social media (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, TikTok) that when they buy your item through WhoSki.com, we donate ££ to charity, PLUS they are helping keep valuable textiles out of landfill.

Happy selling!

Read Part 1: Our tips on how to post the best images to help sell your ski clothes

Read Part 2: Our tips on how to write the best description for a successful sale

Read more WhoSki.com Seller Tips here

Sell like a pro: how to write a killer description

Are you new to WhoSki.com or marketplace selling? Follow our tips to build the most effective listing and help your ski clothes sell FAST!

Part 2 : Providing the right information in your description will help clinch that sale and ensure your ski clothes stay in active usage to delight another skier.

Part 1: Our tips on how to post images that will help sell your ski clothes

Part 3: Our tips on getting the pricing right for a successful sale

1 your headline

Your listing headline should make it clear what you are selling, including details such as size/age and using keywords such as ‘ski jacket’ ‘snowboots’. This helps make it easier for wannabe buyers to find your beautiful item via search and also saves time when scrolling through listings.

Top tip: Size matters. Prioritise sizing in your headline to help make it easier for others to know immediately if this item may be suitable.

2 KEYWORDS ARE KING

Use keywords like ski jacket, ski pants, child’s ski jacket etc in your description. This will increase your presence in the world of Google search – the more people see your post, the more likely you are to win the sale. Use the generous word count in our description box when you upload your ski gear for sale – the more information you can include the better.

Top tip: Brands sell, so include the make of your item, whether it’s high street or designer.

3 HIGHLIGHT FEATURES

Take a good look at the item you are selling and include all key features that may be of interest to others. Does it have a detachable hood, where are the zipped vents, how many pockets, is there a powder skirt or built-in googles wipe? Check the manufacturer’s website for info on your item if it is still for sale there.

Top tip: Be honest about any wear and tear, and include info about defects. Your customer needs to know exactly what they are buying.

4 DETAIL COUNTS

Check the label in your item and add details to your written description including sizing information, waterproof rating (measured in resistance from 5k rainproof minimum up to 20k max), breathability and warmth ratings. For children’s wear, it can be useful to know if waistband and legs are adjustable.

Top tip: Sizes/ages don’t always tell the whole story. Include key measurements eg sleeve length, inside leg, waist etc.

5 PRICE IT RIGHT

Are you charging a realistic price? How keen are you for your item to sell? If you want it to shift, price it lower. And if you are unsure what the right price is, think about what you would be prepared to pay for it secondhand. Remember too that you can always go back to your item and reduce the price if it is not selling.

Top tip: When listing your item, check spellings in your headline and description. An error can mean it doesn’t come up in search results.

Remember to let your audience know via social media (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, TikTok) that when they buy your item through WhoSki.com, we donate ££ to charity, PLUS they are helping keep valuable textiles out of landfill.

Happy selling!

NOW READ: Part 1: our tips on how to post the best images to help sell your ski clothes

AND: Part 3: Our tips on getting the pricing right for a successful sale

Read more WhoSki.com Seller Tips here

Read full WhoSki.com listing rules here

Sell like a pro: listing pic tips for a quick sale

Are you new to WhoSki.com or marketplace selling? Take our advice to create the most effective listing and help your ski clothes sell FAST!

Part 1: Check out our tips below on posting images that will help you clinch a quick sale.

Part 2: Our tips on how to write the best description for a successful sale

Part 3: Our tips on getting the pricing right for a successful sale

1 POST AT LEAST 3 IMAGES

Every advertiser knows: good pics sell product. When listing your ski clothes, aim to post at least three good images – front, back and side, with extra ‘action shots’ if you have them. Seeing how a ski jacket, pants or all-in-one look on a real person, as well as on a hanger, could clinch your sale. Use the clearest pic of the item for sale as your first ‘hero’ image. Note that, unlike some marketplace sites, we do not limit to four the number of images you can post.

Top tip: Check your listing after it’s posted and make sure your first ‘hero’ image looks good on site. It is super simple to swap the image order by editing your listing even after posting.

2 NEUTRAL BACKGROUND

Use a plain background for your clothing shots. Remove any extraneous clutter, which can distract attention from the lovely item you want to sell. Ski clothing is often colourful: pose it in front of a plain white wall or door, or on a parquet floor rather than a patterned rug or carpet.

Top tip: Highlight any areas of wear/damage to ensure your customer knows exactly what they are buying.

3 TAKE PICS IN BRIGHT, EVEN LIGHT

Avoid shadows, make sure you clearly indicate any areas of damage, smooth out any creases. Ski jackets often look better if you ‘pose’ the arms: lightly pad them with tea towels or similar and tuck sleeves into a pocket for the killer photo.

Top tip: Avoid using filters on your images: customers need to get a realistic idea of colour/shade of the item that they are buying.

4 HIGHLIGHT KEY POINTS

Does this item of clothing have key features that may clinch that sale? What really sold it to you in the first place? Extra pockets, built-in powder skirt, sleeve or leg vents? Make sure you highlight key features in your photographs and mention them in the description too.

Top tip: Include a legible image of the clothing label as proof of brand, size, waterproof/warmth ratings.

One more piece of advice: only use your own photos. Customers want to see the secondhand item they are buying rather than an idealized commercial version.

Read full WhoSki.com listing rules here

Remember to let your audience know via social media (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, TikTok) that when they buy your item through WhoSki.com, we donate ££ to charity, PLUS they are helping keep valuable textiles out of landfill.

Happy selling!

NOW READ: Part 2: Our tips on how to write the best description for a successful sale

AND: Part 3: Our tips on getting the pricing right for a successful sale

Read more WhoSki.com Seller Tips here

University ski trip survival tips

Signed up for the university ski trip? We got a bunch of student ski trip veterans to share their survival tips…

Travel: sURVIVE the bus trip

“It’s pretty brutal but I would highly recommend it for your first ski trip as it’s part of the experience. Lots of students choose to get the bus out but fly home at the end of the week.”

“Although flying is definitely the nicer option, as a first year student, taking the coach with everyone else is really fun and hypes you up for the trip. You have to do it once!”

TIP: Take a travel pillow… “30 hours on the bus without one IS NOT fun”

Be sure to pack…

A Bluetooth speaker. “Essential for pre- après in your room, on the slopes, on the bus.”

Although also: “Be quiet after 10:30ish in your room, the French police are far from friendly and there have been horror stories of confiscated speakers or phones controlling those speakers thrown from balconies. It might be tempting to keep the après going but hit the bar and save yourself a nightmare.”

Alcohol. “Take a bottle of spirits with you: MUCH cheaper than buying in a resort. Plus a small flask to sneak into après.”

“I definitely recommend taking caffeinated painkillers with you because waking up hungover, running on no sleep, with sore legs from the day before… these will resurrect you! You also may not be able to find them in the resort, so keep them handy.”

Ski clothing essentials (as well as the obvious…)

A roomy onesie to wear over your ski gear. “It’s really fun and also makes you and your friends easier to spot on the piste, in the lift queues etc”

Extra socks: “Bring way more socks than you think you’ll need (they always become disgusting and changing before après is an unlikely pleasure)”

“If you want to have style, bring a vintage ski suit with you. Also bring a backpack, ideally one that is older, because it will take a beating.”

“Customise your helmet! At après they all get dumped on the floor, you don’t want to be that guy who goes home empty-handed because of a helmet mix-up. Who doesn’t love a cool sticker?”

On the piste

“Try to go with / make a friend who’s at the same level as you. In my friendship groups we tend to split up into those who can ski well and those who can’t and then meet up for après.”

Lessons: “Everyone I know who did them recommended them. My advice: go in the afternoon if you can. There’s no way you’ll make a 9am ski lesson every day of the week after going out every night.”

“If you’re worried about safety have a buddy ski down with you after the après on the slopes because sometimes people get lost on the way home.”

survive the après

Comfy shoes for going out: “Snowboots are waaay too hot to wear in clubs / bars at night. Something like Converse/Van -style shoes have been the best compromise for me.”

“Try to drink tons of water. Also, try and drink alcohol in your room to save money. Watch yourself in the clubs, because it’s so easy to spend all your money. Don’t take it too far the first few days, it’s all about stamina!”

“No matter how bad the hangover, aim to be on the slopes as early as you can most days. Being at the top of the mountain almost cures the hangover & you can do a week of drinking for free at home, don’t waste the experience.”

“Unless you’re made of stronger stuff than I am, give yourself one pass for the week not to go out drinking (it’s pretty much impossible to ski every day and make après and every night out)”

save money on your ski kit

“On the Uni ski trip, they offer a clothing rental service, but with the prices on WhoSki – it’s cheaper to buy secondhand than rent. Bonus: you get to keep them! For next time or to re-sell after. Genius!”

Read more: Be a sustainable student skier

Sell your ski clothes in five simple steps

Embrace the re-sale vibe and sell on your no longer needed ski clothing. It’s simple with WhoSki.com. Here’s how:

Step 1: Clear out your SKI wardrobe

Motivate yourself for a ski closet clear-out by remembering that selling it on helps keep it out of landfill: you are doing the environment a favour. Plus you’re helping monetise your wardrobe – and keeping skiing affordable. Ski and snowboard clothes are hardwearing, so perfect for re-use and re-sale.

Step 2: Make sure your ski clothes are clean and in tip-top condition

Wash any items if needed and check for wear and tear so your buyer knows exactly what to expect. Better condition items will likely fetch a higher price. Any damage? Pay your local sewing repair shop a visit. You may be surprised what wonders they can work on a frayed salopette hem, dodgy ski jacket zip or gaping seam.

Step 3: Photograph and upload

When snapping your ski clothing, keep the background plain, photograph from front and back, capture details and highlight any damage / marks etc. Read more selling tips here.

Register at WhoSki.com (super-simple via any device: phone, tablet or PC), upload details of the ski clothes you are selling along with fixed price and images, and post for sale. It’s easy to edit the info afterwards so don’t worry if you make a mistake.

Top tip – make the first photo of your item ‘landscape’ as it fits better on the WhoSki.com shop homepage.

Step 4: Watch your ski clothes sell!

Secondhand clothing does not always sell immediately – although WhoSki.com does enjoy some instant sales, especially at peak ski season. Be patient and wait for the right buyer to come along. Share a link to your post on social media to help attract buyers – and remember to celebrate your sale. Remember too: at WhoSki.com we donate 25% of our commission to charity on every item sold.

Step 5: Wrap and post it

Delight your customer with a swift response by getting their ski clothes delivered as quickly as you can. Re-use packaging where possible; turn an old delivery bag inside out, recycle a tough paper bag, and think about using strong paper tape rather than plastic.

Keep your customer informed via the WhoSki.com private messaging system (and hang on to your postal receipt to track your item’s progress).

ANd that’s it: simple!

Let us know how you get on – are you happy with the process? How much money have you made on your good-as-new ski clothing – or how much have you saved by buying secondhand? Drop us an email with your comments.

Register at WhoSki.com to buy and sell, PLUS – coming soon! – receive updates about latest ski clothes that go on sale so you won’t miss out on the best pre-loved piste wear.

WhoSki.com join SATI (Sustainable Alpine Tourism Initiative): how to green up your wintersports habit

WhoSki.com was delighted to join a panel of major players in the snowsports field for last month’s virtual SATI conference.

SATI is the Sustainable Alpine Tourism Initiative which promotes knowledge sharing and collaboration on sustainability in alpine tourism. The circular economy was a focus for this conference. It’s exactly what we are trying to promote in the wintersports clothing sector by enabling you to buy and sell preloved items from your ski and snowboard wardrobe, extend their lifecycle and keep them out of landfill. Find out more about our eco-motivations.

Our SATI webinar back in December discussed the impact of mountain tourism and how to make the right choice for the environment when enjoying snowsports. Here are some of the tips we picked up from the event:

1 Booking your ski holiday

Look for a smaller, specialist company which works with specific resorts and can book you into accommodation providers with established sustainability plans to reduce their carbon impact. For example, bookdifferent.com will give you a “staygreencheck” rate, public reviews and carbon footprints as well as clear top tips for responsible holidays. The platform is simple and easy to use.
If you book though a major ski company, ask what they are doing to reduce environmental impact, how they are working with resorts and why they don’t do more to help consumers understand how to #SkiGreen.

2 Travel to your ski resort

Flight costs look likely to rise in the wake of last year’s enforced shutdown, plus we all know the environmental damage air travel causes. Driving might be tempting from a Covid-secure point of view, but the train is your most eco-friendly alternative.
Visit snowcarbon.co.uk for timetable information and travel options to your chosen resort. They’ve done the hard work to make booking easier for you. Or follow theskipodcast.com where host and creator Ian Martin touches on many snowsports-related topics, including vehicle-free resorts.

3 Do your research

Attend the www.NationalSnowShow.com this autumn. The #SkiGreen agenda will be a big part of their offering at the show at the NEC in October 2021 with input from a number of emerging green companies across the whole snowsports sector. Come along and find out more.
PS: bring your preloved ski clothing – WhoSki.com will be present to help keep your jackets and pants out of landfill and in circulation. We’ll be providing more info closer to the date.

4 Dress green

No longer wanted wintersports clothing is notoriously difficult to recycle with its mixed fabrics, coatings, zips and fastenings. That’s why so many brands are now using sustainable materials in their collections. But however eco your clothing’s credentials, re-use always beats recycle. Ensuring every item of clothing gets the maximum number of wears should be your goal.
That’s why we created WhoSki.com as the online marketplace where you can buy and sell good quality secondhand ski and snowboard clothing. Perfect for families and students on a budget. It’s also the ideal solution for Instagrammers wanting to snap a different look every day for their channel.

Look out too for brands like Planks, Picture, Surfdome and EcoSki which offer transparency in manufacturing and sustainability credentials. Some brands will repair damaged clothing including Patagonia and Norrøna. In Scotland, try Scottish Mountain Gear.
Even skis are going green, with some marques using wood and other natural materials to make them increasingly recyclable.

5 Get your voice heard!

Finally, we recommend you sign up to protectourwinters.uk which is lobbying government and business to act on the environmental impacts of wintersports. Follow us on twitter @wewhoski for more eco-ski inspo, and spread the word: it might just be the best thing you do this winter while ski and snowboarding is off limits.

What clothing is essential for a school ski trip?

For many people, the first time they even think about buying ski clothing is when their child is signed up for a school ski trip. You’ve paid for travel, tuition and accommodation, but how many of those items on the kit list do you really need to buy?

See above a genuine plea for help from a mum-friend just this week. The message thread continued…

ski trip message continued...

Hmm, yes: having the wrong kit could well be a factor!

No parent wants their child to be uncomfortable on the mountain, especially if you’re skiing with them (every ski parent will do everything they can to minimise small skier whingeing, right?), so making sure they’ve got the right clothing is essential.

If you’re not a ski parent, however, it can be hard to know what on that lengthy list of recommended school ski kit clothing is a must-have, and what you can skip buying or borrowing.

Here’s what I recommend, after almost two decades of skiing with children (from age 0 upwards):
MUST-HAVES:

  • warm, waterproof ski jacket and trousers or ski suit. You cannot ‘make do’ with non-specialist equipment here: waterproofing, flexible movement, pockets and padding will make for an all-round better ski experience.
  • mid-layer. This can be a simple fleece, but make sure it has a zip so the wearer can open and close according to weather and exertion
  • ski goggles. More protective than sunglasses, less easy to lose, warmer for the face on a cold day or when it is snowing.
  • ski gloves. Absolutely essential as cold hands are a source of misery for many. You might also want to throw in a pair of thin glove liners
  • ski socks. Longer than normal socks with heat-retaining qualities and the right padding in the right places, two pairs of ski socks for a week’s trip will be enough, provided your child puts them on the radiator to dry between wears.
  • snowboots. No child or adult should ever go skiing without a chunky pair of cosy, waterproof snowboots. They mean kids can play in the snow without getting frostbite of the toes, and adults can walk to the bar/supermarket/ski school pick-up point without slipping over. Wear them on the journey to cut down on luggage weight
  • slippers/Crocs. Aka footwear you can wear between bootroom and chalet/hotel room. The first sign you will see at the entrance to your accommodation will be: no outdoor footwear. Without slippers (ideally, something robust with a sturdy sole) your socks will quickly be soggy. Yuck.

NICE-TO-HAVES:

  • handwarmers. Keeping one of these in your pocket for those super-cold days can make a big difference, although there will be years when you don’t need them at all. Good news though: they don’t go off, so save them for next season if unused.
  • sunglasses. I would never go skiing without a pair in my pocket, but my kids have been known to stick with goggles whatever the weather. One less thing to lose, too!
  • thermal underwear. I always made sure my young kids wore thermals – and sometimes that was all they needed under their ski suits – but for teens, not essential.
  • helmet. Essential to wear, but easy to rent. You only really need to own one if you’re a habitual skier.
  • ski boots. As above: wait to buy them until you’ve got the ski bug.

Looking for ski clothes for your child’s next ski trip or school ski trip? Visit the WhoSki.com shop for pre-loved, good-as-new ski clothing at a fraction of the RRP.

Got children’s ski clothing that no longer fits? Pass it on via our preloved ski clothing marketplace.

We donate to charity on every sale.

Cold feet skiing solutions

Having cold feet can ruin your ski experience. What’s the answer for those of us who find chilly toes an issue on the piste?

Invest in quality socks

No 1 investment for cold feet sufferers should be quality ski socks. Investing in a few pairs of really good ski socks should definitely be top of your list of solutions if cold toes are your problem.

If there’s room inside your ski boots, you may find wearing two pairs of thinner socks in place of a single thicker pair will make a difference. Do always make sure, though, that you have space to wiggle your toes and move your feet: this will aid circulation and help keep your feet warmer.

TIP: Warmer socks will contain a higher percentage of Merino. Choose the right size for your feet, and opt for a pair with specific right and left foot options as padding, compression etc will be in the right place for comfort and heat.

Choose boot heaters

Ensure boots are warm and dry when you put them on. You can’t always rely on hotel/chalet boot heaters which are often insufficient/non-existent/non-operational, so packing your own device is a good idea. Portable boot heater options include the Sidas Drywarmer shoe warming and drying appliance (cost c £20), a mains-powered device that pops inside your boots and gently dries them overnight. UV light helps zap bacteria. These mini-warmers are super-versatile, so you could also use them for running shoes, wellies, walking boots etc, as well as for larger ski gloves. Recommend.

For those with serious cold feet issues, including Reynaud’s Syndrome or diabetes sufferers, consider investing in an on-board heating system. You have a couple of options here: boot heaters or heated socks.

Therm-ic PowerSock heated socks: costly, at approaching £200. Battery pack tucks into the top of the sock, can be adjusted via your phone using Bluetooth connection. Socks should be washed at max 30degC. You’d probably need at least a couple of pairs for a week-long ski trip, pushing up the price even further. Also, socks need to be long in order to fit battery pack above boot top level, thus increasing bulk.

From personal experience, we believe the better option is a Therm-ic in-boot heating system, powered by rechargeable battery packs. You’re recommended to get the insole installed at a ski shop so the wires are correctly located, though you can do it yourself. Leads poke out of the top of the back of your boot and plug into powerpacks which click securely onto your boot straps. Buttons on the powerpack enable you to switch the device on/off and adjust the heat levels.

We recommend:

One of our founders Nicola has skied with Therm-ic boot heaters for more than 10 years, and refuses to ski without them: “I’m a February half-term skier, when conditions can be cold, and barely a day goes by without me switching on my boot heaters. I am amazed you don’t see more of them around. For me, they are a ski essential.”

Got warm ski kit you no longer need? Keep it out of landfill, pass it on via our online marketplace.