Sell like a pro: price it right for a successful sale

Are you new to marketplace selling? Take our advice to create the most effective listing and help your ski clothes sell FAST!

Part 3 : Pricing your item right will help it fly out of WhoSki.com and into the hands of another skier. If your goal is to sell quickly and your motivation is to keep ski clothes out of landfill and in active usage: our tips should help.

Perhaps your ski kit has been on sale for a while but still not been snapped up? A price reduction might help… Read on for more secondhand sales pricing tips.

Part 1: Our tips on how to post images that will help sell your ski clothes

Part 2: Our tips on how to write the best description for a successful sale

1 Get the pricing right

Experienced skiers know that a new designer ski jacket could come with a £500+ price tag. But let’s face it, most of us would not dream of paying jaw-dropping prices like that.

Be realistic when you are pricing your garment for re-sale. Think affordable. However, be wary of pricing it too cheap unless you really want a fast sale – buyers may suspect it is damaged or of poor quality.

Top tip: Use the description box to mention the as-new RRP of your item to make it clear what kind of deal your buyer is getting.

2 What is a realistic price?

Bear in mind that secondhand items rarely sell for even half the original price, unless they are pristine ie unused, with the original labels still attached.

Selling on your pre-loved clothing helps reduce its (and your) carbon footprint. It is a way of recouping some of your outlay but we advise that you set your sights realistically. Think about the eco benefits of ensuring your clothes get maximum wear – and remember we donate to charity on every sale.

Top tip: High Street brands sell quickly – they are affordable and your customer is familiar with them, so do price accordingly. People will spend more on designer brand ski clothes, but remember affordability is key in the secondhand sector.

3 Check the competition

Browse the WhoSki.com shop on a regular basis. You will start to learn what sells, at what price, and what seems to shift more slowly. Make sure you are signed up to receive our emails which announce new listings so you can keep an eye on the competition. (If you’re not already a WhoSki.com member, register here for your email updates.)

When pricing your outfit, check what else is on offer at WhoSki.com. If you spot something similar, check the cost and think ‘Would I pay that?’ to give you a steer on your price point.

Top tip: Selling items affordably as a set rather than individually may help attract a buyer eg a pack of ski socks, a selection of base layers or matching ski jacket and salopettes. If they don’t sell, split and re-list them individually.

4 Be prepared to drop your price

We are a fixed-price marketplace, not an auction site, but it is easy to adjust the pricing of your items if you find they are not selling. Simply log in, visit your account and edit your listing. You can also re-write the description to make it clear you have reduced the price, if you wish.

Top tip: Think about timing when trying to sell your pre-loved ski clothes. The pre-Christmas period is buzzing as is half-term for kids’ stuff. Towards the end of the ski season, there is generally little ski clothing left in the shops so you may well clinch a last-minute sale at WhoSki.com.

One extra point to bear in mind: the ski season for UK skiers is relatively short. Most transactions in our marketplace take place between October and April, but you can leave your items on sale at WhoSki.com for as long as you like. If they don’t sell this season, they may well be snapped up next.

Read full WhoSki.com listing rules here

Remember to let your audience know via social media (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, TikTok) that when they buy your item through WhoSki.com, we donate ££ to charity, PLUS they are helping keep valuable textiles out of landfill.

Happy selling!

Read Part 1: Our tips on how to post the best images to help sell your ski clothes

Read Part 2: Our tips on how to write the best description for a successful sale

Read more WhoSki.com Seller Tips here

Sell like a pro: how to write a killer description

Are you new to WhoSki.com or marketplace selling? Follow our tips to build the most effective listing and help your ski clothes sell FAST!

Part 2 : Providing the right information in your description will help clinch that sale and ensure your ski clothes stay in active usage to delight another skier.

Part 1: Our tips on how to post images that will help sell your ski clothes

Part 3: Our tips on getting the pricing right for a successful sale

1 your headline

Your listing headline should make it clear what you are selling, including details such as size/age and using keywords such as ‘ski jacket’ ‘snowboots’. This helps make it easier for wannabe buyers to find your beautiful item via search and also saves time when scrolling through listings.

Top tip: Size matters. Prioritise sizing in your headline to help make it easier for others to know immediately if this item may be suitable.

2 KEYWORDS ARE KING

Use keywords like ski jacket, ski pants, child’s ski jacket etc in your description. This will increase your presence in the world of Google search – the more people see your post, the more likely you are to win the sale. Use the generous word count in our description box when you upload your ski gear for sale – the more information you can include the better.

Top tip: Brands sell, so include the make of your item, whether it’s high street or designer.

3 HIGHLIGHT FEATURES

Take a good look at the item you are selling and include all key features that may be of interest to others. Does it have a detachable hood, where are the zipped vents, how many pockets, is there a powder skirt or built-in googles wipe? Check the manufacturer’s website for info on your item if it is still for sale there.

Top tip: Be honest about any wear and tear, and include info about defects. Your customer needs to know exactly what they are buying.

4 DETAIL COUNTS

Check the label in your item and add details to your written description including sizing information, waterproof rating (measured in resistance from 5k rainproof minimum up to 20k max), breathability and warmth ratings. For children’s wear, it can be useful to know if waistband and legs are adjustable.

Top tip: Sizes/ages don’t always tell the whole story. Include key measurements eg sleeve length, inside leg, waist etc.

5 PRICE IT RIGHT

Are you charging a realistic price? How keen are you for your item to sell? If you want it to shift, price it lower. And if you are unsure what the right price is, think about what you would be prepared to pay for it secondhand. Remember too that you can always go back to your item and reduce the price if it is not selling.

Top tip: When listing your item, check spellings in your headline and description. An error can mean it doesn’t come up in search results.

Remember to let your audience know via social media (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, TikTok) that when they buy your item through WhoSki.com, we donate ££ to charity, PLUS they are helping keep valuable textiles out of landfill.

Happy selling!

NOW READ: Part 1: our tips on how to post the best images to help sell your ski clothes

AND: Part 3: Our tips on getting the pricing right for a successful sale

Read more WhoSki.com Seller Tips here

Read full WhoSki.com listing rules here

Sell like a pro: listing pic tips for a quick sale

Are you new to WhoSki.com or marketplace selling? Take our advice to create the most effective listing and help your ski clothes sell FAST!

Part 1: Check out our tips below on posting images that will help you clinch a quick sale.

Part 2: Our tips on how to write the best description for a successful sale

Part 3: Our tips on getting the pricing right for a successful sale

1 POST AT LEAST 3 IMAGES

Every advertiser knows: good pics sell product. When listing your ski clothes, aim to post at least three good images – front, back and side, with extra ‘action shots’ if you have them. Seeing how a ski jacket, pants or all-in-one look on a real person, as well as on a hanger, could clinch your sale. Use the clearest pic of the item for sale as your first ‘hero’ image. Note that, unlike some marketplace sites, we do not limit to four the number of images you can post.

Top tip: Check your listing after it’s posted and make sure your first ‘hero’ image looks good on site. It is super simple to swap the image order by editing your listing even after posting.

2 NEUTRAL BACKGROUND

Use a plain background for your clothing shots. Remove any extraneous clutter, which can distract attention from the lovely item you want to sell. Ski clothing is often colourful: pose it in front of a plain white wall or door, or on a parquet floor rather than a patterned rug or carpet.

Top tip: Highlight any areas of wear/damage to ensure your customer knows exactly what they are buying.

3 TAKE PICS IN BRIGHT, EVEN LIGHT

Avoid shadows, make sure you clearly indicate any areas of damage, smooth out any creases. Ski jackets often look better if you ‘pose’ the arms: lightly pad them with tea towels or similar and tuck sleeves into a pocket for the killer photo.

Top tip: Avoid using filters on your images: customers need to get a realistic idea of colour/shade of the item that they are buying.

4 HIGHLIGHT KEY POINTS

Does this item of clothing have key features that may clinch that sale? What really sold it to you in the first place? Extra pockets, built-in powder skirt, sleeve or leg vents? Make sure you highlight key features in your photographs and mention them in the description too.

Top tip: Include a legible image of the clothing label as proof of brand, size, waterproof/warmth ratings.

One more piece of advice: only use your own photos. Customers want to see the secondhand item they are buying rather than an idealized commercial version.

Read full WhoSki.com listing rules here

Remember to let your audience know via social media (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, TikTok) that when they buy your item through WhoSki.com, we donate ££ to charity, PLUS they are helping keep valuable textiles out of landfill.

Happy selling!

NOW READ: Part 2: Our tips on how to write the best description for a successful sale

AND: Part 3: Our tips on getting the pricing right for a successful sale

Read more WhoSki.com Seller Tips here

Cutting carbon impact with the support of Ski Line

Welcoming specialist wintersports travel agent Ski Line as a new WhoSki.com partner – you may have spotted their logo on our Partners Page.

We have teamed up with them because of their commitment to sustainability. As the company explains: “Ski Line promises to highlight green initiatives being undertaken by our featured ski resorts”. They also promote more eco-friendly travel options like taking the train. Bravo!

So this is a quick welcome and well done to Ski Line as our latest partner in the #SkiGreen movement, plus a shout out to the 15,000 plus skiers that will be travelling with them this winter.

If just a fraction of those skiers think pre-loved ski clothing this season, we will be keeping A LOT of extra wintersports clothing in active usage and out of landfill. Which is of course what WhoSki.com is all about.

Read the WhoSki.com guest blog on the Ski Line website

University ski trip survival tips

Signed up for the university ski trip? We got a bunch of student ski trip veterans to share their survival tips…

Travel: sURVIVE the bus trip

“It’s pretty brutal but I would highly recommend it for your first ski trip as it’s part of the experience. Lots of students choose to get the bus out but fly home at the end of the week.”

“Although flying is definitely the nicer option, as a first year student, taking the coach with everyone else is really fun and hypes you up for the trip. You have to do it once!”

TIP: Take a travel pillow… “30 hours on the bus without one IS NOT fun”

Be sure to pack…

A Bluetooth speaker. “Essential for pre- après in your room, on the slopes, on the bus.”

Although also: “Be quiet after 10:30ish in your room, the French police are far from friendly and there have been horror stories of confiscated speakers or phones controlling those speakers thrown from balconies. It might be tempting to keep the après going but hit the bar and save yourself a nightmare.”

Alcohol. “Take a bottle of spirits with you: MUCH cheaper than buying in a resort. Plus a small flask to sneak into après.”

“I definitely recommend taking caffeinated painkillers with you because waking up hungover, running on no sleep, with sore legs from the day before… these will resurrect you! You also may not be able to find them in the resort, so keep them handy.”

Ski clothing essentials (as well as the obvious…)

A roomy onesie to wear over your ski gear. “It’s really fun and also makes you and your friends easier to spot on the piste, in the lift queues etc”

Extra socks: “Bring way more socks than you think you’ll need (they always become disgusting and changing before après is an unlikely pleasure)”

“If you want to have style, bring a vintage ski suit with you. Also bring a backpack, ideally one that is older, because it will take a beating.”

“Customise your helmet! At après they all get dumped on the floor, you don’t want to be that guy who goes home empty-handed because of a helmet mix-up. Who doesn’t love a cool sticker?”

On the piste

“Try to go with / make a friend who’s at the same level as you. In my friendship groups we tend to split up into those who can ski well and those who can’t and then meet up for après.”

Lessons: “Everyone I know who did them recommended them. My advice: go in the afternoon if you can. There’s no way you’ll make a 9am ski lesson every day of the week after going out every night.”

“If you’re worried about safety have a buddy ski down with you after the après on the slopes because sometimes people get lost on the way home.”

survive the après

Comfy shoes for going out: “Snowboots are waaay too hot to wear in clubs / bars at night. Something like Converse/Van -style shoes have been the best compromise for me.”

“Try to drink tons of water. Also, try and drink alcohol in your room to save money. Watch yourself in the clubs, because it’s so easy to spend all your money. Don’t take it too far the first few days, it’s all about stamina!”

“No matter how bad the hangover, aim to be on the slopes as early as you can most days. Being at the top of the mountain almost cures the hangover & you can do a week of drinking for free at home, don’t waste the experience.”

“Unless you’re made of stronger stuff than I am, give yourself one pass for the week not to go out drinking (it’s pretty much impossible to ski every day and make après and every night out)”

save money on your ski kit

“On the Uni ski trip, they offer a clothing rental service, but with the prices on WhoSki – it’s cheaper to buy secondhand than rent. Bonus: you get to keep them! For next time or to re-sell after. Genius!”

Read more: Be a sustainable student skier

Club Europe supporting sustainability through WhoSki.com

A huge cheer for school ski trip provider Club Europe, for taking strong steps towards improving sustainability in its operations. Not only is it recommending WhoSki.com as the place to buy and sell secondhand ski clothing, it is looking at ways to reduce its environmental impact across all areas.

The company is the latest to partner with us to help keep pre-loved ski clothing in active usage for longer and make skiing more affordable.

As Club Europe says: “The idea is simple: reduce the quantity of new ski clothes that are bought and old ones that are sent to landfill, by enabling families to easily buy and sell pre-loved ski wear.”

What to pack for a family ski trip

KEEPING SKI CLOTHES ON THE PISTE

Club Europe will be helping hundreds of youngsters take a school ski trip this season. If even a fraction of those young skiers and their families buy and sell their ski clothing via WhoSki.com, they will potentially help keep a mountain of clothing out of landfill and reduce its carbon footprint by extending its active life.

WhoSki.com co-founder Nicola Davenport says: “We are delighted to be working with Club Europe, a school ski trip provider that is committed to sustainable business.

“Raising awareness of WhoSki.com as a secondhand marketplace for good quality ski clothing helps not only keep textiles in circulation but also raises the profile of sustainability in the wintersports sector generally. The more we all do to think #SkiGreen, the brighter the future for our mountains.”

Club Europe is recommending WhoSki.com as a first stop for buying specialist kit for a school ski trip, as well as the best place to sell on unwanted but good quality ski clothes that no longer fit.

Club Europe: Committed to sustAinability

Alison Wareham, Club Europe’s sustainability lead, adds: “As a responsible travel provider, we are committed to sustainability in our development, operations and marketing. Partnering with WhoSki.com not only helps the environment but gives families a small financial boost – saving money on ski wear and perhaps by selling their own unwanted ski fit, making a few pennies too.”

Read more:
School ski trip essential clothing

What to pack for a family ski trip

Register with WhoSki.com to WIN a two-night cottage stay

Register at WhoSki.com using your special code (available via our social media or at The National Snow Show Oct 15-16) for a chance to win your two-night break.

Sign up to WhoSki.com here to enter this free prize draw.

Sleeping up to four people, boutique-style Barbers Cottage is tucked away in the beautiful town of Shaftesbury in North Dorset.

Register at WhoSki.com by October 31, 2022, using the promo code, to be automatically entered for the chance to win your relaxing two-night stay at Barbers Cottage.

it’s so easy to use whoski.com

Remember: once you’ve registered at WhoSki.com it is simple to sell on your no-longer-needed ski and snowboard clothes via our marketplace. Registration is free, plus we donate 25% of our commission to award-winning teen mental health charity stem4 on every sale.

Buying and selling your good quality wintersports clothing via WhoSki.com keeps it in active usage, out of landfill and reduces the carbon footprint of your ski or snowboard habit. Plus it’s the perfect way to keep your ski trip affordable and recoup some of the cost of your winter wardrobe.

Can’t be bothered to list those clothes yourself? Maybe get a family member to help, and let them keep the proceeds. Listing at WhoSki.com takes just a matter of minutes once you have completed our quick registration process.

Our free prize draw ends on October 31st, 2022. Click for full terms and conditions.

WhoSki.com : best for Business Innovation

Team WhoSki.com enjoyed a super-successful Merton Best Business Awards ceremony last night, taking home a trophy for Business Innovation – AND a runner-up award for Sustainable Impact.

Judges put us in first place for innovation, stating our entry demonstrated ‘new skills, approaches and attitudes’. Exactly what we are all about at WhoSki.com: a new approach to wintersports that puts #SkiGreen and sustainability front of mind.

Circular economy wins

Making sure you extend the active life of your ski and snowboard clothing by selling it on via WhoSki.com when it’s of no more use to you, is one of the easiest ways to #SkiGreen. It also helps make a trip to the mountains more affordable by keeping down the cost of essential clothes and enabling you to monetise your existing ski wardrobe.

Back to the awards…

After that first win, WhoSki.com co-founders Sally and Nicola were delighted to be called back to the stage as second place runners up for the Sustainable Impact category. Our entry was pipped to the post by the brilliant Polka Theatre in our hometown of Wimbledon. Congratulations to them!

Keeping textiles out of landfill

Remember: experts calculate that extending the active life of clothing by just
three months per item, leads to a 5-10% reduction in its carbon, water and waste footprint.

By choosing secondhand and re-selling on WhoSki.com, you are helping keep valuable textiles out of landfill and in circulation.

A top awards night

A big thank you to all Merton Best Business Awards organisers, sponsors and attendees at the event, which took place at Wimbledon’s AELTC All England Club. It was a treat to meet so many talented, interesting and committed business owners, staff and volunteers. Well done all.

YMHD with our charity partner stem4

The annual YMHD campaign from WhoSki.com’s charity partner stem4 aims to get young people talking and taking part in activities to improve their mental health, and to support others to do likewise. Taking place on September 22nd, Youth Mental Health Day 2022 is focusing on sharing stories to enable young people to connect.

stem4 is an award-winning organisation which specialises in developing and distributing free apps (backed by the NHS) to help young people cope with mental health issues. Of the 2,007 young people the charity surveyed ahead of Youth Mental Health Day, nearly half (46%) said they were
currently experiencing mental health difficulties.

Here at WhoSki.com we donate 25% of our commission from every sale to stem4. So, by selling through our peer-to-peer marketplace, you are directly helping support teenage mental health.

CONNECT MEANINGFULLY

Over the past few years, young people have been forced to experience many of their most formative experiences virtually—from joining a new school, college, university or workplace, to celebrating milestones such as exams and big birthdays.

By focusing on the importance of meaningful connections and having a solid support system, this year’s YMHD is inviting young people across the UK to reflect on how their relationships (with family, friends, teachers etc.) have changed over the past few years.

stem4 is inviting them to share ideas and set goals on how they can #ConnectMeaningfully to foster relationships that will support and positively impact their mental health.

The Wimbledon-based charity is best known for its four, award-winning, NHS-approved, free mental health apps, including Calm Harm and Combined Minds, which have been downloaded by more than 3.2 million people globally.

WHOSKI AND STEM4

Partnering with stem4 is our way of supporting a charity which helps teenagers access positive mental health support easily, and through their phones. Every item you buy or sell through WhoSki.com directs a charitable donation to this important cause.

We chose stem4 as our charity partner in recognition of the mental health benefits of taking part in wintersports activities like skiing and snowboarding. Being active outdoors, in the mountains and the fresh air brings benefits for both mental and physical health.

BACK TO THE SLOPES

Season 2022/23 looks likely to be the first academic year since 2018/19 when school / college timetables go ahead as normal. We know that our school ski trips partner Halsbury Ski will be running a full schedule of ski trips. Likewise, UK universities are gearing up to get back to the slopes – in many cases, for the first time in three years.

How to be a sustainable student skier

Here’s hoping that all who are planning a ski trip to the slopes in the coming months find it beneficial for their mental and physical health – in particular the young people who have so suffered so much from isolation and limited opportunities in their formative years.

Find out more about stem4 and YMHD here.

What is the circular economy?

WhoSki.com is a proud circular economy business – but what does this even mean?

In the simplest terms, circularity means keeping stuff – like ski clothes – in use for as long as possible, in either its existing form or at its highest value.

For example, rather than taking to the dump a ski jacket or snowboard pants that you no longer want or need, you make sure they are re-used as secondhand clothing by someone else while they are fit for purpose. Selling them on via WhoSki.com as long as they are wearable extends the life cycle of your pre-loved ski clothes, cuts their carbon footprint and reduces their impact on the environment.

Experts calculate that extending the active life of clothing by just three months per item, would lead to a 5-10% reduction in the carbon, water and waste footprints of your family’s secondhand ski outfits. Find out more on our ski eco page.

THE PUREST FORM OF CIRCULARITY

A peer-to-peer marketplace like WhoSki.com is the purest form of a circular economy business. Other circularity business models include taking existing items and ensuring they are either re-used as something else, or their components are recycled into other useful items. Doing so ensures that materials such as textiles, metal or plastics are re-purposed rather than sent to landfill or incinerated.

WHY THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY MATTERS

Textiles are among the five main areas where the circular economy can make a difference because they are a major contributor to current waste volumes, touch all of us at some point in our lives and show real potential for improvement. Find out more about this at the ReLondon website.

ReLondon (formerly LWARB) is a partnership of the Mayor of London and London boroughs to help the city waste less and re-use, repair, share and recycle more.

Similar organisations exist elsewhere in the UK. For example, Wales has Circular Communities Cymru.

In Glasgow, the Chamber of Commerce runs the Circular Glasgow Network.

It highlights textiles as among the key sectors where the circular economy can help reduce carbon emissions, focusing on “secondhand, re-sale and rental models that extend the lifetime of garments” as key. Circular Glasgow also points out that “the impact of the added logistics of cleaning and transport must be carefully considered”. Selling your secondhand ski clothing peer-to-peer via WhoSki.com keeps these logistics to a minimum.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY

If you want to find out more about the circular economy, we recommend visiting the websites linked to above. Additionally, the Zero Waste Scotland website has much useful information as does the Ellen MacArthur Foundation which has long been researching and lobbying on circularity issues.

Image by Freepik

WhoSki.com supporting Secondhand September

WhoSki.com is all about making best use of secondhand clothing, so naturally we are 100% supporting Oxfam’s Secondhand September campaign.

The campaign – now in its fourth year – encourages us all to buy secondhand before we consider buying new. Do it properly and you will buy NOTHING NEW all month. Find out more about the Secondhand September campaign here.

LIST YOUR SECONDHAND SKI COTHING NOW

September is good timing for skiers and snowboarders, as it’s the perfect time to sort out your ski clothing into what still fits and you want to keep, versus what doesn’t fit or you are tired of and is good enough quality to sell on.

Listing it for sale NOW on WhoSki.com gives you the best chance of getting no longer needed ski clothing out of your wardrobe and into circulation. Selling it via our peer-to-peer marketplace has (at least) three benefits:

Click here to visit the WhoSki.com shop where you can list your clothing for sale – registration is free. We donate to teen mental health charity stem4 on every sale.

Are you taking part in Secondhand September? Let us know via social media: @WeWhoSki on Twitter and Instagram / https://www.facebook.com/whoskiLLP at Facebook.

What happens to our unwanted clothing?

According to Greenpeace, as little as 10% of donated clothing, for example to charity shops, is sold on for re-use in the country where it was collected. The rest is likely to be broken down and used as rags – aka ‘down-cycled’ – with more than half exported to an overseas market. That usually means Africa or Eastern Europe.

What happens to secondhand clothing once exported?

Some is sold at markets. This is not necessarily a good outcome. For example, the scale of imports of unwanted clothing from Europe and the US has decimated the indigenous textiles and tailoring industries in many African countries. To counteract this problem, Rwanda imposed high tariffs on used clothing imports followed by a total ban on their importation in 2018.

Increasing amounts of fast fashion find their way into the clothing markets of the Global South, but only around 10% re-sells there. Much is poor quality or unsuitable for local needs and is therefore unusable.

What happens to unsold secondhand clothing in the Global South?

With limited or non-existent recycling facilities or infrastructure in the Global South, our unwanted clothing rarely comes to a sustainable end.

Incineration: The rising cost of gas and oil raises the danger that textile waste will increasingly be burned to generate power. Garment factories in Cambodia were found recently to be incinerating off-cuts including tags, labels, footwear, fabric and garment scraps.

The result? Burning acrylic garments releases plastic microfibres and other toxic chemicals with knock-on impacts on human health in both the short- and long-term. Incinerating unwanted textiles also increases the carbon footprint of clothing made in foreign factories for the European and US markets. It is also a massive waste of resources.

Landfill: The Global South is the principal destination for secondhand – and new – clothing that cannot be re-sold or recycled. A recent report from The Observatory of Economic Complexity (OEC) claims up to 40% of used clothing exported to African countries such as Kenya and Tanzania has no market value and is basically just textile waste.

The result? Piles of dumped clothing in locations like the coast of Ghana, the Atacama Desert in Chile and river banks in East Africa. Unwanted ski clothing is now also turning up in the textile dumps of the Global South.

What can we all do to reduce textile waste?

The obvious answer is buy less and throw away less. If every item of clothing was worn for longer, its carbon footprint would reduce considerably and the demand for new clothing would fall. There would be less wastage and fewer used textiles would be exported.

Buying and selling secondhand clothing such as ski and snowboard wear is a way to extend its life and prevent it from being shredded, incinerated or ending up in the Global South where it pollutes the environment.

Do your bit for sustainability: make this the season you choose pre-loved ski wear.